THE Active Indoor Leisure ASSOCIATION

TRAMPOLINE(+) PARK INSPECTION & ASSESSMENT PATHWAY

A GUIDE TO TRAMPOLINE(+) PARK STANDARDS INSPECTION & ASSESSMENT

Introduction

The Active Indoor Leisure Association (TAILA) has partnered with the Leisure Equipment Asset Protection Scheme (LEAPS) to provide an integrated and market leading inspection & assessment process recognised by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

Welcome to the TAILA x LEAPS Inspection & Assessment Pathway for UK Trampoline Parks.

As the trade association leading on trampoline park standards, we understand the importance of providing a safe and enjoyable experience for park visitors.

Our joint inspection & assessment program is designed to offer trampoline park owners peace of mind; ensuring their park meets minimum safety standards in construction and operation as identified in ISO 23659:2022, and previously PAS5000:2017. By undertaking the TAILA x LEAPS Trampoline Park Inspection & Assessment Pathway, you can also unlock a range of benefits that can elevate your park’s reputation, improve financial stability, and open doors to new opportunities.

Why Get Assessed?

1. Peace of Mind for Owners – Safeguarding Visitors

Your visitors’ safety is paramount. By undertaking the assessment pathway, you demonstrate your commitment to best practice safety standards. Your park’s construction and operations are assessed, covering aspects such as, park construction, risk management, maintenance protocols, staff training, emergency procedures, and more. This comprehensive assessment helps you identify any potential exposure or failure to meet the expected standards, so you can provide a well constructed and managed environment for those who visit your trampoline park. Furthermore, a recognised third party assessment against recognised standards can help protect owners from potential criminal prosecution for failings under Health and Safety legislation.

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Former trampoline park bosses face jail after people left with broken backs 🔗

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2. Enhanced Defensibility Position

Assessment provides an essential layer of protection for trampoline park owners.

By voluntarily meeting recognised safety standards, you bolster your defensibility position in the event of negligence claims. Demonstrating your commitment to safety through standards inspection and assessment establishes a strong foundation in your defence against allegations of negligence, showing your commitment to protect your visitors from harm. This increased defensibility can help mitigate potential legal risks and safeguard your business’s reputation.

3. Protect Insurance Premiums

Investing in third party trampoline park inspections and assessments can reduce the number of, and your exposure in, negligence claims. Insurance providers value a proactive approach taken by trampoline parks in prioritising safety. By adhering to prescribed standards and implementing best practices, you minimise the risks associated with accidents and potential liability claims. This can prevent significant increases in insurance premiums, and may result in premium reductions, allowing you to allocate resources more efficiently or invest in further park improvements. In addition, a considered approach to risk management could bring stability to the provision of insurance for trampoline parks in the UK.

4. Access to Schools, LOtC & Youth Organisations

The TAILA x LEAPS Inspection & Assessment Pathway for UK Trampoline Parks is the first step* to gain access to a wide range of groups, including schools and youth organisations, and those represented by The Council for Learning Outside the Classroom (LOtC). The TAILA x LEAPS Inspection & Assessment Pathway lends credibility to your park’s operation, making it an attractive destination for schools seeking unique and engaging learning experiences. By partnering with educational institutions and LOtC-affiliated groups, you can expand your customer base, foster community relationships, and create mutually beneficial partnerships that contribute to the growth of your park and it’s community.

Don’t miss out on the incredible benefits of the TAILA x LEAPS Inspection & Assessment Pathway for UK Trampoline Parks. By joining our inspection & assessment pathway, you can use a certified 3rd party inspector to verify that your park meets the minimum safety standards, providing peace of mind for both owners, visitors & enforcing bodies. Beyond safety, assessment may lead to reduced insurance premiums, increased defensibility against legal claims, and expanded access to larger groups & organisations like schools and the LOtC. Take this opportunity to elevate your trampoline park to new heights, solidifying your position as a trusted and sought-after destination in the UK. Get assessed today and embark on a journey towards excellence and success for your trampoline park.

The Assessment Process

There have been two published standards that address the safe construction and operation of a trampoline park for UK parks.

  1. March 2017: “BSI PAS5000:2017 Specification for the construction and operation of a fixed indoor trampoline park.” Accessible here 🔗
  2. November 2022: “ISO 23659:2022 Trampoline parks — Safety requirements.” Accessible here 🔗

Like both the BSI PAS5000:2017 and ISO 23659:2022, the assessment process is broken into two defined areas: Construction & Operation

Parks are assessed by Inspection Bodies (IBs) that are certified by our assessment partner, the Leisure Equipment Asset protection Scheme (LEAPS), a scheme recognised by the Health & Safety Executive, and by extension local enforcement bodies like EHOs.

Which Assessment Standard?

Trampoline Park ISO Inspection & Assessment Pathway

Operational Assessment

All parks will be assessed to the latest Operational Standards, regardless of build date. This means the standards set out in ISO 23659:2022 for operations will be assessed in all cases.

Operational Assessment: All operational assessments will be assessed against the standards of ISO 23659:2022

Construction Assessment

The date of park build will dictate which operational standard will be used to assess the construction of the park.

Simply, equipment built before the publication of ISO 23659:2022 will be assessed to the standards of BSI PAS5000:2017. Equipment built after the publication of ISO 23659:2022 will be assessed to the standards of ISO 23659:2022.

Construction Assessment: Equipment built before November 2022 will be assessed to the standards of BSI PAS5000:2017. Equipment built after November 2022 will be assessed to the standard of ISO 23659:2022

Equipment built before PAS5000:2017 will still be assessed to this standard, in order to gain accreditation.

Parks built before November 2022 can elect to be assessed to the construction standards of ISO 23659:2022.

No successful assessment can be given or considered for parks that have equipment within the scope the above standards, but that does not meet the standard, regardless of the date of construction. This would lead to an assessment fail.

What is the Assessment Process

Inspections normally take place in a single day per park. However, your inspector may discuss a different approach to assessment, if they are assessing multiple parks for you, or dependant on the size of your park.

Next Steps

1. Join TAILA & LEAPS

Access to the assessment process is dependant on becoming a member of The Active Indoor Leisure Association (TAILA) & the Leisure Equipment Asset Protection Scheme (LEAPS). We’ve negotiated a significantly discounted rate for joint membership. Click here to join.

Once you purchase membership, you’ll be sent the registration process for both organisations. You’ll also be sent the assessment protocols!

2. Get the Standards Documents

You’ll need the standards documents in order to ensure you comply with the content within. You can get those here:

  1. BSI PAS5000:2017 Specification for the construction and operation of a fixed indoor trampoline park. Accessible here 🔗
  2. ISO 23659:2022 Trampoline parks — Safety requirements. Accessible here 🔗

Don’t forget – you won’t need the PAS5000:2017 if your park was built after November 2022. Both construction and operational assessments will be considered against ISO 23659:2022 alone.

3. Book your Assessment(s) with an Approved Inspection Body

Booking into your inspection is simple. Your LEAPS registration will list certified inspection bodies that can assess your park(s) to the appropriate standards.

LEAPS will ensure Inspection Bodies (IBs) are competent to inspect – one of the reasons LEAPS assessments are recognised by the HSE.

You will be given advice by the inspector to help you prepare, and they will set a date and process for inspection. Note: Inspection Body fees may differ.

Upon Successful Inspection…

A successful inspection will lead to your facility being listed on the TAILA Register of Inspected Parks & the LEAPS Directory of Certified Parks – both recognised by the Health and Safety Executive and the Council for Learning Outside the Classroom.

Accessing the Council for Learning Outside the Classroom (LOtC)

Once you have received your PAS/ISO, and have an active joint membership with the Active Indoor Leisure Association & the Leisure Equipment Asset Protection Scheme, you’ll be eligible to apply to join the LOtC.

This process has it’s own assessment. We have prepared a guide for this assessment, available to Joint TAILA x LEAPS Members here (you must log in with the correct membership product to access this page).

Existing PAS5000:2017 Inspection Holders

Your facility may have previously been inspected to meet the standards of PAS5000:2017.

In Section 5.11.2 of ISO 23659:2022, the latest relevant standard for the operation of trampoline parks, a comprehensive Annual Inspection and Biennial Inspection shall be carried out in accordance with the standard.

As such, we recommend facilities with an existing assessment to PAS5000:2017 should complete an inspection to ISO 23659:2022, within 2 years of their last PAS5000:2017 inspection, or by the 2nd Anniversary of the release of ISO 23659:2022, whichever may come first.

Existing TAILA Aspirant Members can purchase a ‘bolt on’ LEAPS membership to begin the TAILA x LEAPS Inspection and Assessment pathway. Click here to join.

The role of the Active Indoor Leisure Association (TAILA) and the Leisure Equipment Asset Protection Scheme (LEAPS)

Most of the TAILA committee, along with international partners, sit on the expert panel for the authoring of ISO 23659:2022 (another round of consultation is currently taking place on the existing standard). This committee have done outstanding work to ensure the demands of ISO 23659:2022 are reasonable, realistic, achievable, and not cost prohibitive. The process of authoring a standards document often requires compromise & sacrifice – while all experts are committed to participant safety, not all agree on how to achieve it.

As an example of the work done by members of the TAILA committee – some standards proposed during the draft of the ISO included proposals that may have doubled direct labour salaries for court monitoring, without demonstrating compelling evidence for a resulting increase in participant safety. In fact, it was felt by operational experts that this approach would ultimately reduce participant safety. Our experts successfully lobbied for a common sense approach, that appropriately allocates resources and attention where it is best placed to reduce risk.

Our relationship with LEAPS is a recognition of the growing demand for 3rd party leisure & attractions inspections by certified & trusted inspectors. TAILA understand that trampoline park safety is paramount to the future of our industry. In addition, the majority of operators want to know their parks and the procedures they have in place, meet the published standards.

The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) are keen to see a considered approach to park safety and inspection. This inspection procedure aims to meet those needs, and serve as a reference for local enforcement bodies, like your local Environmental Health Officers (EHOs).

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